Posted in Opinions and Thoughts

Wednesday Whys, 7 Nov 2012

More random thoughts while pounding out the miles both on the road and on my trusty treadmill:

  • Why did everyone swoon over Han Solo instead of Luke Skywalker?

    Picture of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Han Solo
    Who would you choose?
  • Why do people put their mobiles on speaker and then hold the phone up next to their mouths? Do they think that speakerphone is the same thing as “hands free”?
from http://www.culture-chat-lounge.com
  • Why do people treat public toilets like pigsties? Would you walk away from an unflushed toilet in your home or at your office? I think people just get gross in public areas. I always try to leave a public restroom better than when I came in, which usually means taking an extra paper towel and wiping up the area around the sink. It’s a small gesture but I think it helps and it makes me feel good.
OK, That's Just Gross
from http://www.funnyjunk.com
  • Why are there always a few who need to unbuckle their seatbelts on the plane before the “fasten seatbelt” sign is turned off? Do you really feel constricted by that little belt? So much so that you couldn’t bear another 30 seconds of wearing it?
No Smoking and Fasten Seatbelt Signs
  • Why do people wear sunglasses indoors? Do they think they really look that cool? I think they look silly, not cool.
Wearing Sunglasses Indoors
from http://www.sodahead.com

And the thought processor churns on…

 

Posted in Opinions and Thoughts

Wednesday Whys, 24 Oct 2012

As I was running on Sunday, my first run since the NWM26.2, my mind started wandering. Thoughts just popped into my head and instead of puzzling over them and trying to find an answer, I just let the thoughts come and go. Sort of like when you’re meditating and when a thought comes, you acknowledge it and let it go.

I didn’t want to completely let them go, though, so I thought I would jot down some of these questions each week. And if I ever come up with an answer to any of these questions, I’ll write about it.

In no particular order:

  • Why do guys wear their pants underneath their buttocks? Why don’t they just walk around in their boxer shorts?
  • Why do guys – and girls – wear baseball caps indoors? Even worse, why do they wear baseball caps – or any hat – while they are eating?
  • Why do guys – and girls – not take their hats off when the national anthem is being played or sung?
  • Why do men – especially old, white men – have so much power over women’s reproductive rights?
  • Why do naps feel so wonderful? And why did we stop taking naps in kindergarten?
  • Why cats only want to cuddle when you’re trying to read?
  • Why do people insist on multi-tasking even though it’s been proven to be less productive?
  • Why do people think they can text and drive at the same time?
  • Why does a run feel so easy one day but so difficult another day?
  • Why are reality shows guilty pleasures? Why feel guilty about watching something you enjoy?

If you’re not scared by this peek inside my running mind, check back in coming weeks for more.

And the thought processor churns on…

Posted in Opinions and Thoughts, Running

Warning: Sharp Elbows!

Ah, the running community.

Runner at the start
Runner at the start (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To an outsider looking in, the running community seems like a tight-knit yet welcoming, supportive, encouraging, motivational group.

And for the most part, that is true.

However, if you hang out in the community long enough – and by “hang out” I mean read running magazines, read running blogs, join a running group on Facebook, follow runners on Twitter, and so on – you’ll find that the there are members of the community who aren’t quite as supportive, who aren’t quite as encouraging, who aren’t quite as motivational as you’d think at first glance. There are members of the running community who are smug, self-righteous, and sanctimonious. They are the ones who have sharp elbows.

Right now you’re thinking, “The same is true for any group, for any community!” That’s true, I agree. Every group or community has members that don’t always show the group or community in its best light.

It could just be that I’ve been overly sensitive these past couple of months as my running hasn’t been quite where I want it to be or where it needs to be.

I was browsing around on Facebook one day and ran across Runner’s World magazine Facebook page.  The page had a link to a Runner’s World blog of motivational poster #31. The poster had a picture of an obviously overweight man sitting on a couch with a remote in his hand and he was lit by what we are to assume was the television. The poster was captioned, “Can’t find 30 minutes a day to exercise? Look harder.”

The poster in itself, I had no problems with. What did strike a nerve, however, were the comments on the Facebook post and the blog comments. A majority of them just struck me as sanctimonious and self-righteous. There were posts from people who said they never watched television and couldn’t understand people who did. I understand not watching television – after my trip to Costa Rica a few years ago, I didn’t watch television for nearly six months.

But to say that you cannot understand people who do watch television? To smugly announce all the things that keep you so busy during the day that you don’t have time to watch television? To self-righteously say that the people who do watch television deserve all the health problems they end up with? To snicker at people who aren’t quite as fit and trim and healthy as you are? I have a problem with that. I have a problem with the judgmental tone that some of the comments took.

I watch television. I watch up to two hours each weeknight. Sometimes three. More on the weekends when there’s baseball, football, or tennis being broadcast. Am I staring at the television the entire time? No, I’m usually going through my mail, flipping through a magazine, working on a crossword puzzle, writing in my journal, chatting with my parents during commercial break. Would I use those two or three hours to run? Not likely because I generally run in the morning. Would those other runners sneer at me because of that? Probably.

We shouldn’t be sneering at overweight people who would rather watch television than exercise for 30 minutes. We should be trying to help them, trying to support them, trying to motivate them. We shouldn’t be thinking that we are better than they are – for all we know, they may bring more worth to the world in their daily lives than we do with all our running miles, running shorts, and running shoes. We shouldn’t be deriding people whose time management skills aren’t as good as ours. We should be finding ways to encourage them and work with them to change or improve their habits.

Runners should support people, not tear them down. Runners should encourage people to share their healthy lifestyle, not mock them. Runners should share their love for running, not make snide comments about the sedentary.

Since the time I happened across that Facebook posting and that blog post – and some other blog posts and comments in a Facebook running group that I’m part of – it’s been hard to think of runners in a positive way. It’s okay because I think those self-righteous, sanctimonious, and smug people probably wouldn’t call me a runner. They’d probably snidely call me a jogger.

That doesn’t bother me – I’ll label myself, thank you very much. In the meantime, I’m doing all I can to avoid runners with sharp elbows – in real life and in the digital world. I hope you do, too.

Happy Running!